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Linton Primary School
Main Street, Linton, DE12 6QA, UK Swadlincote
+44 (0)1283 760382
www:http://www.linton.derbyshire.sch.uke-mail:headteacher@linton.derbyshire.sch.uk

Working together to achieve excellence in our enthusiastic and caring school

I am pleased to welcome you to the Linton Primary School website.

We hope that it helps you gain an insight into the life and work of the school and provides you with useful information such as school organisation and staffing, dates and contact details.

Through the website, we want to celebrate the achievements and work of the school and our pupils, to share good news and the things we are doing to improve the quality of education provided by the school.

We welcome visits from prospective parents and pupils at any time of year. If you are thinking of moving into the area and are interested in the school, please contact us so we can arrange a visit.

The website is a new venture for us and will be developed over the coming months to provide a wide range of information and news about the school. If you have suggestions for what you would like to be included on the site, as a parent, prospective parent or pupil, please send your suggestions to school.

With best wishes from Sarah Cottle

AIMS AND VALUES

Linton Primary is committed to providing the highest quality of education for all our pupils. We believe in working together to make sure that school is a safe, secure, friendly and purposeful place where children are encouraged, challenged and supported to do their best and learn. In order to do this, we are committed to a programme of continual school improvement; constantly looking at what we are doing and how we can improve.

We know that it is important for children to enjoy lessons and we actively look for ways in which we can make engage and interest pupils through a varied and interesting curriculum, using different approaches to teaching and learning.

In September 2006 we introduced our new thematic curriculum. Pupils learn through themes, linking subjects through integrated activities to make learning more interesting and engaging. There is a focus on developing skills as well as knowledge with pupils having the opportunity to work independently, in pairs and in groups. We plan special events, including themed weeks and days, inviting visitors into school and taking children out of school to extend their learning further and give pupils the opportunity to discover and develop their talents.

We believe that it is essential to develop children’s self-confidence and self-esteem so that they have the confidence to tackle new things, develop independence and learn effectively. We try to build children’s self-esteem through positive rewards, focussing on what children do well and the effort they are making both in their work and behaviour. It is important to listen to children and value their ideas and opinions.

 

We also try to build children’s self-esteem and confidence by involving them in the life of the school and involving them in their own education, encouraging them to make good choices about what they do and how they do it.

Children have the opportunity to take on responsibility for particular aspects of school life. This may be through being a member of the school council or by taking on a specific role as a monitor or co-ordinator for particular activities.

Parents are a very important part of our school team and we are keen for you to become involved in your child’s education. You will be kept informed through regular communications and newsletters. There will also be opportunities to come into school to discuss your child’s progress and also share in activities and special events. We are committed to looking at ways in which we can improve the way in which we communicate with parents and increasing the number of opportunities parents have to share in the work of the school and the achievements of their children. These include open evenings and workshops for parents, class assemblies, special event assemblies and open days when you can share in lessons and learning.

We also encourage you to consider helping in class, perhaps listening to readers or helping with special activities such as sewing and cooking or supporting fund raising events perhaps by joining the Parents Association [PA].

FOUNDATION STAGE

All 4 year olds and many 3 year olds are entitled to free part-time education. These early years, together with their time in reception class at primary school, make up the foundation stage.

It probably won't feel like learning - most children see it as just fun and play. But as they get to grips with speaking and listening, singing and dancing, stories and counting, they'll be gaining all the basic skills that will get them off to a flying start when they reach year 1.

'What is the Foundation Stage?'

It's for children aged 3-5, and covers the years they spend from the beginning of nursery or pre-school to the end of reception class in primary school. It was introduced in September 2000 to cover these important years in your child's life.

'Where will my child go for Foundation Stage?'

The government is funding Foundation Stage places:

  • in nursery and reception classes
  • in playgroups
  • in pre-schools
  • in nurseries
  • with accredited childminders in approved childminding networks.

Wherever your child goes, staff who work with them will focus on the Early Learning Goals.

They set out what most children are expected to achieve by the end of the foundation stage. They help people who work with children aged 3-5 to focus on what children need to learn. They are not a curriculum with lots of different subjects. They are six broad areas of learning.

  • Personal, social and emotional development. Your child will learn to be self-confident, take an interest in things, know what their own needs are, tell the difference between right and wrong, and be able to dress and undress.
  • Communication, language and literacy. Your child will learn to talk confidently and clearly, enjoying stories, songs and poems, hearing and saying sounds, and linking them to the alphabet. They will read and write some familiar words and learn to use a pencil.
  • Mathematical development. Your child will develop an understanding of maths through stories, songs, games and imaginative play. They will become comfortable with numbers and with ideas such as 'heavier than' or 'bigger'. They will be aware of shapes and space.
  • Knowledge and understanding of the world. Your child will explore and find out about the world around them, asking questions about it. They will build with different materials, know about everyday technology and learn what it is used for. They will find out about past events in their lives and their families' lives. They will find out about different cultures and beliefs.
  • Physical development. Your child will learn to move confidently, controlling their body and handling equipment.
  • Creative development. Your child will explore colours and shapes, trying out dance, making things, telling stories and making music.

KEY STAGE 1

These years of your child's time at school are called key stage 1.

At the end of each key stage, each National Curriculum subject has a target: your child should have reached a particular level of skills, knowledge and understanding.

Why have targets and tests?

  • Children get a sense of achievement from reaching each milestone in their learning, and going beyond it.
  • Schools use them to check on children's progress, so that they can match their teaching to each child's needs and abilities.
  • The government uses them to see how many children are making the right kind of progress (especially in English and mathematics, where children take National Curriculum tests and tasks at age 7).

Of course, some children may not make as much progress as others and some have special educational needs. Please read the important information about this in the section on frequently asked questions.

As a parent or carer, you have a very important role to play in helping your child learn. Some parents are afraid of doing the wrong thing. (If you are unsure about how to help, you can always ask your child's teacher.) The most important things you can do are:

  • take an interest in what your child is learning at school, and encourage them to tell you about it
  • praise them when they have done well.

There are other things you can do, too: this book also gives ideas and tips for each subject. Don't feel you have to do all of them, but any you can do will support your child's learning at school.

KEY STAGE 2

These years of your child's time at school are called key stage 2.

At the end of each key stage, each National Curriculum subject has a target - your child should have reached skills, knowledge and understanding at a particular level.

Why have targets and tests?

  • Schools use them to see where children need to improve, so that they can tailor their teaching.
  • Children get a sense of achievement from a milestone and going beyond it.
  • The government uses them to see how many children are making the right kind of progress (especially in English, Maths and Science, where children take National Curriculum tests at age 11).

Of course, some children may not make as much progress as others and some have Special Educational Needs. Please read the important information about this on subsequent pages.

As a parent or carer, you have a very important role to play in helping your children learn. The most important thing you can do is be interested in what your child is learning at school, and encourage them to tell you about it and explain it. Some parents are afraid of doing the wrong thing. Remember, you can never go wrong by showing interest in your child's learning. There are other things you can do too: this site gives ideas and tips for each subject. Don't feel you have to do all of them, but any you do find time to do will support your child's learning at school.



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